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 avis aux littéraires

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wendy



Nombre de messages : 5
Date d'inscription : 20/11/2006

MessageSujet: avis aux littéraires   Lun 20 Nov - 17:54

Hey !

Alors voilà, je suis en première année de LLCE anglais et j'ai un devoir en littérature sur lequel j'aimerais avoir votre aide. Evidemment je ne m'attend pas à ce que vous me donniez le commentaire tout fait, j'aimerais juste avoir des pistes qui vont me servir à mieux comprendre le texte.
Embarassed j'ai vraiment du mal en littérature alors votre aide me serait vraiment précieuse !

voici l'extrait :

"She went back into her dressing-room, and put on her cloak and bonnet for the second time. The unnatural colour still burnt like a flame in her cheeks, the unnatural light still glittered in her eyes. The excitement which she was under held her in so strong a spell that neither her mind nor her body seemed to have any consciousness of fatigue. However verbose I may be in my description of her feelings, I can never describe a tithe of her thoughts or her sufferings. She suffered agonies that would fill closely printed volumes, bulky with a thousand pages, in that one horrible night. She underwent volumes of anguish, and doubt, and perplexity. Sometimes repeating the same chapters of her torments over and over again. Sometimes hurrying through a thousand pages of her misery without one pause, without one moment of breathing time. She stood by the low fender in her boudoir, watching the minute hand of the clock, and waiting till it should be time for her to leave the house in safety.

"I will wait ten minutes," she said, "not a moment beyond, before I enter on my new peril."

She listened to the wild roaring of the March wind, which seemed to have risen with the stillness and darkness of the night.

The hand slowly made its inevitable way to the figures which told that the ten minutes were past. It was exactly a quarter to twelve when my lady took her lamp in her hand, and stole softly from the room. Her footfall was as light as that of some graceful wild animal, and there was no fear of that airy step awakening any echo upon the carpeted stone corridors and staircase. She did not pause until she reached the vestibule upon the ground floor. Several doors opened out of this vestibule, which was octagon, like my lady's ante-chamber. One of these doors led into the library, and it was this door which Lady Audley opened softly and cautiously.

To have attempted to leave the house secretly by any of the principal outlets would have been simple madness, for the housekeeper herself superintended the barricading of the great doors, back and front. The secrets of the bolts, and bars, and chains, and bells which secured these doors, and provided for the safety of Sir Michael Audley's plate-room, the door of which was lined with sheet-iron, were known only to the servants who had to deal with them. But although all these precautions were taken with the principal entrances to the citadel, a wooden shutter and a slender iron bar, light enough to be lifted by a child, were considered sufficient safeguard for the half-glass door which opened out of the breakfast-room into the gravelled pathway and smooth turf in the courtyard.

It was by this outlet that Lady Audley meant to make her escape. She could easily remove the bar and unfasten the shutter, and she might safely venture to leave the window ajar while she was absent. There was little fear of Sir Michael's awaking for some time, as he was a heavy sleeper in the early part of the night, and had slept more heavily than usual since his illness.

Lady Audley crossed the library, and opened the door of the breakfast-room which communicated with it. This latter apartment was one of the later additions to the Court. It was a simple, cheerful chamber, with brightly-papered walls and pretty maple furniture, and was more occupied by Alicia than any one else. The paraphernalia of that young lady's favourite pursuits were scattered about the room--drawing-materials, unfinished scraps of work, tangled skeins of silk, and all the other tokens of a careless damsel's presence; while Miss Audley's picture--a pretty crayon sketch of a rosy-faced hoyden in a riding-habit and hat--hung over the quaint Wedgwood ornaments on the chimneypiece. My lady looked upon these familiar objects with scornful hatred flaming in her blue eyes.

"How glad she will be if any disgrace befalls me!" she thought; "how she will rejoice if I am driven out of this house!"
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Doudou



Nombre de messages : 1286
Localisation : New-York
Date d'inscription : 26/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: avis aux littéraires   Lun 20 Nov - 19:47

Salut, Wendy.

Pour commencer, le meilleur que je peux faire c'est de remanier le texte pour le rendre plus compréhensible.
*************************************************
She went back into her dressing-room, and put on her cloak and bonnet for the second time.
She returned to her dressing-room.
She wore a cloak and bonnet for the second time.

The unnatural colour still burnt like a flame in her cheeks, the unnatural light still glittered in her eyes.
Her cheeks and her eyes had an unnatural appearance.
The excitement which she was under held her in so strong a spell that neither her mind nor her body seemed to have any consciousness of fatigue.
She didn't feel tired because of her strong emotions.
However verbose I may be in my description of her feelings, I can never describe a tithe of her thoughts or her sufferings.
It's impossible to describe even a small part of her sufferings.
She suffered agonies that would fill closely printed volumes, bulky with a thousand pages, in that one horrible night.
Her agonies (sufferings) were so great that one could write many books to describe them.
She underwent volumes of anguish, and doubt, and perplexity.
She was the victim of anguish, doubt, and confusion.
Sometimes repeating the same chapters of her torments over and over again.
Torments she had suffered at other times returned.
Sometimes hurrying through a thousand pages of her misery without one pause, without one moment of breathing time.
She never had any rest from her sufferings.
She stood by the low fender in her boudoir, watching the minute hand of the clock, and waiting till it should be time for her to leave the house in safety.
She waited in her bedroom until she could leave the house in safety.
"I will wait ten minutes," she said, "not a moment beyond, before I enter on my new peril."
She decided to wait exactly 10 minutes before facing some new danger.
She listened to the wild roaring of the March wind, which seemed to have risen with the stillness and darkness of the night.
It was a windy night in March.
The hand slowly made its inevitable way to the figures which told that the ten minutes were past.
The clock showed that she had waited more than 10 minutes.
It was exactly a quarter to twelve when my lady took her lamp in her hand, and stole softly from the room.
At 15 minutes before midnight, she quietly left her room.
Her footfall was as light as that of some graceful wild animal, and there was no fear of that airy step awakening any echo upon the carpeted stone corridors and staircase.
She walked very softly so that nobody would hear her.
She did not pause until she reached the vestibule upon the ground floor.
She continued downstairs to the vestibule without stopping.
Several doors opened out of this vestibule, which was octagon, like my lady's ante-chamber.
She could leave the vestibule through any door.
One of these doors led into the library, and it was this door which Lady Audley opened softly and cautiously.
Lady Audley very quietly opened the door to the library.
To have attempted to leave the house secretly by any of the principal outlets would have been simple madness, for the housekeeper herself superintended the barricading of the great doors, back and front.
She couldn't leave through any other door because the housekeepr had made it impossible.
The secrets of the bolts, and bars, and chains, and bells which secured these doors, and provided for the safety of Sir Michael Audley's plate-room, the door of which was lined with sheet-iron, were known only to the servants who had to deal with them.
Only the servants could unlock the other doors, including Sir Michael Audley's special room.
But although all these precautions were taken with the principal entrances to the citadel, a wooden shutter and a slender iron bar, light enough to be lifted by a child, were considered sufficient safeguard for the half-glass door which opened out of the breakfast-room into the gravelled pathway and smooth turf in the courtyard.
There was one door to the outside of the house which one could open with little difficulty.
It was by this outlet that Lady Audley meant to make her escape.
This is the door Lady Audley decided to use.
She could easily remove the bar and unfasten the shutter, and she might safely venture to leave the window ajar while she was absent.
She would have no difficulty leaving. She would leave a window open a little bit so that she could re-enter the house.
There was little fear of Sir Michael's awaking for some time, as he was a heavy sleeper in the early part of the night, and had slept more heavily than usual since his illness.
Sir Michael Audley was sick and would not wake up as Lady Audley left the house.
Lady Audley crossed the library, and opened the door of the breakfast-room which communicated with it.
She went from the library to the breakfast room.
This latter apartment was one of the later additions to the Court.
The breakfast room was a recent addition.
It was a simple, cheerful chamber, with brightly-papered walls and pretty maple furniture, and was more occupied by Alicia than any one else.
The breakfast room was well furnished and was where Alicia spent a lot of time.
The paraphernalia of that young lady's favourite pursuits were scattered about the room--drawing-materials, unfinished scraps of work, tangled skeins of silk, and all the other tokens of a careless damsel's presence; while Miss Audley's picture--a pretty crayon sketch of a rosy-faced hoyden in a riding-habit and hat--hung over the quaint Wedgwood ornaments on the chimneypiece.
Everything that Alicia used to amuse herself was in that room. There was also a picture of Miss Audley on the wall over the fireplace. In the picture, she was wearing the clothes she used for riding a horse.
My lady looked upon these familiar objects with scornful hatred flaming in her blue eyes.
Lady Audley hated everything in the room.
"How glad she will be if any disgrace befalls me!" she thought; "how she will rejoice if I am driven out of this house!
Lady Audley realizes that Alicia would be happy if something bad happens to her. Alicia would like LadyAudley to leave the house forever.

Voilà. Je crois que tu comprendras un peu mieux le texte pour le commenter. Pour les mots que tu ne connais pas, je te propose le dico gratuit sur ce site : http://dictionnaire.tv5.org

Ed
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wendy



Nombre de messages : 5
Date d'inscription : 20/11/2006

MessageSujet: Re: avis aux littéraires   Mer 22 Nov - 10:49

Merci beaucoup Doudou !
ça m'a beaucou aidée en effet !!! Very Happy
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Doudou



Nombre de messages : 1286
Localisation : New-York
Date d'inscription : 26/12/2005

MessageSujet: Re: avis aux littéraires   Mer 22 Nov - 14:17

Je suis ravi d'avoir pu t'aider. Bon courage et bonnes notes.

Ed
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MessageSujet: Re: avis aux littéraires   Aujourd'hui à 4:17

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